Posts

Body Talk

A recent survey found that nearly three-quarters of you are members of a professional coaching organisation. But for those of you who aren’t, confusion still reigns. Liz Hall brings clarity with an in-depth look at what’s on offer.

Professional bodies aren’t everyone’s cup of tea but as coaching buyers begin to ask more questions about accreditation, standards and ethics, more coaches are signing up. And they are discovering the real benefits to be had.

A recent cartoon by our resident humorist Kipper struck a nerve with many of you, highlighting the confusion that still reigns over who does what. How do you decide what body to join? Which are relevant to you? What do they offer?

Some 74 per cent of respondents to Meyler Campbell’s survey of coaches (see news, page 12) are members of a professional coaching body, up on last year’s 65 per cent. There was no clear leader last year either, but in 2009 the Association for Coaching (AC) pulled ahead by a long shot (59 per cent), followed by the International Coach Federation (ICF; 29 per cent), as shown in Table 1.

Please login to continue reading this article

News: Coach sails

Clipper world race for H2O children’s charity. Despite never having sailed before, Terezia Koczka, is taking to the high seas in the Clipper Round the World Race to raise funds for charity. Executive coach Koczka is rising to the challenge, both to celebrate her 60th birthday and to encourage support for the H2O programme, which […]

Please login to continue reading this article

News: Professor Passmore wins the 2012 SGCP Research Award

Jonathan Passmore has won an accolade for his ground-breaking research into the psychology of coaching within driver learning. Professor Passmore won the 2012 British Psychological Society’s Special Group in Coaching Psychology (SGCP) Research Award for a distinguished research project. The award was given for his research into the psychology of coaching as a learning methodology […]

Please login to continue reading this article

Viewpoint; Help or harm?

by Sarah Dale

Does coaching work? Should we use hard evidence or our own judgment to tell us if it’s good? Or is client feedback enough?

As an occupational psychologist who coaches, I was pleased to attend discussions about the evidence for coaching effectiveness at the Division of Occupational Psychology conference, specifically in sessions led by Professor Rob Briner. Evidence-based practice was also the theme of the Special Group in Coaching Psychology’s annual conference in December 2012.

The arguments echo a wider debate, often associated with Ben Goldacre, author of Bad Science, which challenges how we decide what works. They raise important questions about what constitutes good evidence. Ignoring these could put us in the same well-meaning boat as 17th century doctors wedded to their useless (or positively harmful) blood-letting practices. However, few of us work with cast-iron evidence for everything we do. Doctors, lawyers, teachers, parents – and psychologists – all rely on their own judgment at times. As a practitioner, the debate leaves me questioning what I should be doing. I get positive feedback from my coaching.

Please login to continue reading this article

Three minutes to midnight: making the world a better place

Want to change the world? We’re listening… This is the fourth in a new series of columns on our role in tackling the complicated economic, environmental and social challenges we face. It will be a place to question, offer, share, explore, challenge, dissent, celebrate, reflect, learn and enjoy Why don’t they just ‘get it’?!” Have […]

Please login to continue reading this article

Leading Ladies?

Are women still sitting waiting to be asked to dance? Mairi Eastwood reports on research on how to help organisations get more women into the executive group Now that the proportion of women non-executives is moving upwards, attention is focusing, rightly, on the pipeline of senior women in the executive group. Most chief executives we […]

Please login to continue reading this article

The S factor

Spirituality has the potential to connect us all, to let us know what it means to be human, but how can we unbundle it from religious traditions? Katherine Long presents the Refraction model, and the dynamic dance at its core that could give us all a glimpse of an elusive Oneness In spite of an […]

Please login to continue reading this article

Book reviews: Coaching at Work, volume 8, issue 2

Book

Title: Neuropsychology for Coaches – Understanding the Basics
Author Paul Brown and Virginia Brown
Publisher Open University Press
ISBN 978 0335 24547 5
Usefulness ****

The authors of this book set themselves a big task: “to set out a framework within which an executive coach might systematically start to use the immense power of the knowledge that is pouring out of neuroscience research labs worldwide”.

They launch a detailed approach to tackle this. Basic neuroanatomy and neurochemistry are covered, there are some useful coaching examples, and you are signposted to some other valuable resources, too.

Please login to continue reading this article

Mentoring: We’re no poor relations

In the latest in a series of columns dedicated to mentoring, we look at designing mentoring to support physical and mental needs. This issue: disability mentoring

by Lis Merrick

Mentors are vital in helping help people overcome hurdles – both real and perceived

Many people with disabilities are frustrated by their inability to make progress in the corporate world. Even though organisations have great disability equality policies, getting the job in the first place can be the biggest hurdle that a mentor supports them with.

Designing programmes to aid people with disabilities at work can be incredibly difficult, because the wide range of mental and physical disabilities may need to come under a single programme.

Please login to continue reading this article

Research: radical coaching vs groupthink?

Collusion to preserve corporate ideology contributed to the credit crisis. Could critical coaching prevent such thinking, asks Dr Angélique du Toit, of the Coaching and Mentoring Unit at Sheffield Hallam University The notion of ‘groupthink’ is not new – we were first introduced to the concept by Janis (1972;1982). One of the major symptoms of […]

Please login to continue reading this article