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The Coaching Chronicles: James VI and I

Hello, I am Roach the Coach and I am your guide through the Coaching Chronicles. There are 4,500 species of us cockroaches so we are well placed, across the globe, and across time, to tell you about coaching… James succeeded his mother, Mary Queen of Scots, to the throne at the ripe old age of 13 months. As a slightly naive King, it became clear that he was going to need a lot of support, mentoring and coaching to help him accelerate his regal skills. The care of James was entrusted to the Earl and Countess of Mar – a […]

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Who is setting the goalposts?

How do psychologists view goals in coaching? David Megginson, emeritus professor of HRD, Coaching & Mentoring Research Unit, Sheffield Hallam University, finds some unlikely alliances of opinion I’m co-writing a book on goals in coaching, and we have some great contributors from psychology and development offering their own views. What do psychologists who are authors of coaching books say about goals in coaching? This is what I discovered. Organisation agenda Peltier and Lee were two of the earliest coaching psychology books I read. Both drew attention to unconscious processes and opened my eyes to the possibilities of their influencing coaching […]

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Cracking the glass ceiling

Mentoring In the latest in a series of columns dedicated to mentoring, we look at designing mentoring to support women talent. This issue: a women-only programme Cracking the glass ceiling Lis Merrick and Paul Stokes Support your organisation’s female talent by setting up a women-only mentoring programme In the last issue we looked at how you can flex mentoring approaches to support your organisational talent. Supporting women talent requires a further lens on how you look at your talent mentoring design. So, building on last issue’s ideas, here is some advice for a women-only programme. In our initial experience of […]

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HOW TO… COACH GENERATION Y

By BARBARA ST.CLAIRE-OSTWALD

Like any other generational group, Gen Y is uniquely shaped by its historical context. It is only by understanding, respecting and addressing such generational differences in the working environment, that coaches can establish a successful relationship.

There is no consensus on the exact birthdate of Generation Y (Gen Y), but various publications and research studies give it as between 1982 and 2002 (Baby Boomers: 1946-1963, Gen X: 1963-1977 and late Gen X: 1977-1982).

Each generational group has a distinct set of values: how they view authority, their orientation to the world, loyalty, expectations of their leadership and ideal work environment. Each is uniquely shaped by its historical context. These formative influences have enduring effects and bring something new to the workforce, underscoring our need to understand, respect and regularly address generational differences in working practices.

Gen Y at work

A major challenge is an apparent mismatch between what employers want – and the world can offer – and what Gen Y want to do

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Diversity Awareness Ladder

Coaching at Work road-tests the Diversity Awareness Ladder One step at a time 1 The tool What is it? Created by David Clutterbuck, the Diversity Awareness Ladder helps clients and practitioners understand and work with their stereotypes and implicit biases about people they perceive as different from themselves. It has also been used widely in general diversity education. How does it work? The Ladder is a model of two conversations – the inner conversation, which represents instinctive, emotional responses to difference and is not normally spoken out loud; and the outer conversation, which offers a way of engaging with the […]

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Supervised behaviour

Supervision may be mandatory for coaches as far as coaching bodies and providers are concerned, but it remains an emergent market, according to new research by Sam Humphreys and Louise Sheppard There is very little research into the fast-growing market of coaching supervision. So how is it perceived and used by coaches and organisations? Curious to find answers, we decided to start our own research. Beginning last year, we interviewed providers to explore their views and approaches to the provision of coaching supervision. According to our study, prestigious coaching providers TXG, Penna, The Alliance Group, Oxford Group, Hay, Acuity and […]

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We say kia ora…

Coaching that ignores the cultural heritage of non-Westernised clients is ineffective at best. Coaching psychologists in New Zealand understand this and are now required to adapt theories to suit Māori clients. Lisa Stewart reports

Tītmatanga o te matauranga
ko te wahangū,
te wāhanga tuarua ko te whakarongo.

The first stage of learning is silence,
the second stage is listening.

Māori Whakataukī (proverb)

Most coaches and coaching psychologists would agree it is important to adapt our theories and methods to suit our clients, and to respect and value their cultural world views and ways of being. But how often do we do this? In New Zealand, such adaptation is required for coaching psychologists. The New Zealand Psychologists Board1 acknowledges that “the practice of psychology in Aotearoa New Zealand reflects paradigms and world views of both partners to te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi”.

Registered psychologists (including coaching psychologists) must demonstrate “awareness and knowledge of their own cultural identity, values and practices”, and those of their clients – especially of Māori (the indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand) as their Treaty partner. One of the reasons for this approach is to reduce the persistently poorer socio-economic, justice, health and employment outcomes for Māoris.

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High Anxiety

Neuroscience part 3: Showing anxious clients how to reframe their negative self-beliefs through reappraisal strategies can help them better control their emotional responses, says scientist and NLP practitioner Dr Trish Riddell I’m often asked to speak on the neuroscience of learning and memory, or of coaching. Despite studying the brain for about 30 years, I still don’t always believe that I’m qualified to talk on these subjects. A little bit of me worries that someone will ask a question for which I have no answer, that someone in the audience will know more than me and catch me out, or […]

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The health coaching toolkit, part four

Part 4: health coaching expert Professor Stephen Palmer expands on cognitive behavioural health coaching. This issue: cognitive thinking skills

Thinking skills help a client develop Health Enhancing Thinking (HETs). Some health-inhibiting styles of thinking develop over many years and become ingrained and resistant to change. In specific situations, such as smelling one’s favourite fatty food, the client need only think, “That smells great. I must have it now”, and next thing, they are eating it! Or with tasks they fail at, instead of thinking, “I’ve failed to reach my health goals today, I’ll have another go tomorrow”, they have a more unhelpful ending to their Health Inhibiting Thinking (HITs): “I’ve failed to reach my health goals today; this proves I’m a total failure.”

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Quality assured

Against the backdrop of sweeping changes in the NHS, clients are reporting increased ability to manage organisational change, among other benefits, according to ongoing evaluation, say Sue Mortlock and Alison Carter The UK’s National Health Service (NHS) has invested significantly in its executive coach register over the past seven years, in order to quality assure the external executive coaches it uses to coach its senior leaders. The rigorous recruitment to the register has been well-documented (Coaching at Work, vol 5, issue 1). What is less well-known is the work undertaken to evaluate the impact of the coaching this register undertakes. […]

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