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CIPD FINDS 49% OF UK WORKERS WRONGLY SKILLED

There’s a widespread skills mismatch between employees and jobs in the UK, while Britain’s workers are trailing behind counterparts elsewhere when it comes to being creative. Almost half (49%) of UK workers are in jobs they are either under- or over-skilled for, according to the CIPD’s report Over-skilled and Underused: Investigating the Untapped Potential of […]

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HOW TO… COACH GENERATION Y

By BARBARA ST.CLAIRE-OSTWALD

Like any other generational group, Gen Y is uniquely shaped by its historical context. It is only by understanding, respecting and addressing such generational differences in the working environment, that coaches can establish a successful relationship.

There is no consensus on the exact birthdate of Generation Y (Gen Y), but various publications and research studies give it as between 1982 and 2002 (Baby Boomers: 1946-1963, Gen X: 1963-1977 and late Gen X: 1977-1982).

Each generational group has a distinct set of values: how they view authority, their orientation to the world, loyalty, expectations of their leadership and ideal work environment. Each is uniquely shaped by its historical context. These formative influences have enduring effects and bring something new to the workforce, underscoring our need to understand, respect and regularly address generational differences in working practices.

Gen Y at work

A major challenge is an apparent mismatch between what employers want – and the world can offer – and what Gen Y want to do

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Supervised behaviour

Supervision may be mandatory for coaches as far as coaching bodies and providers are concerned, but it remains an emergent market, according to new research by Sam Humphreys and Louise Sheppard There is very little research into the fast-growing market of coaching supervision. So how is it perceived and used by coaches and organisations? Curious […]

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NEWS IN BRIEF

Under pressure Workers in the UK believe middle managers and junior level staff are under more pressure than CEOs and senior executives, according to a study of more than 1,500 UK employees. The study, by OnePoll for consultancy Lane4, found that 48 per cent of workers feel under pressure at work while two-fifths feel they’re […]

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