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HALF OF UK WORKERS QUIT BECAUSE OF LINE MANAGER

A culture of ‘them and us’, dividing line managers and their reports, persists in the workplace, according to a survey by UK jobs board, Totaljobs. The survey of 2,098 UK workers found 49% have quit a job due to having a poor relationship with their manager, 18% admit they feel unable to trust their boss and 28% of workers have singled out their manager as a work enemy. Some 26% have sought support for their mental health, citing the sour relationship with a manager as a main motivation, while 24% admit to having had nightmares about their boss. Only a […]

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UK FIRMS FAILING TO TACKLE SEXUAL HARASSMENT

As more research highlights how widespread sexual harassment still is at work and how little many employers are doing to tackle this, the spotlight is on coaches to explore how they might help. Despite nearly 4 in 10 (37%) women having been sexually harassed at work in the past 12 months and the rise of the #MeToo movement helping increase awareness of the problem, many employers are failing to take adequate steps, according to a survey. Coaches can support clients to come forward about sexual harassment, and can help unearth common organisational cultural themes and patterns of behaviour that contribute […]

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REFLECTIONS: DROP THE ATTITUDE

How can coaching help end male leaders’ discrimination against female colleagues? A systemic stance may reveal deep and lasting change Lindsay Wittenberg Sadly, I’m finding it as common as ever to hear female clients talk of not being acknowledged or included by male colleagues in discussions and decision-making, being bypassed by people making a beeline for a male colleague when the most appropriate address is the female herself, and not being heard in conversations and meetings. Some are subject to derogatory or belittling comments or discrimination – and worse, as the #MeToo movement is highlighting. Such attitudes by men, especially […]

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News in brief: Stress busters

Work-related stress is the most common reason that employers seek occupational health advice, according to statistics compiled by the UK’s Department for Work and Pensions (DWP). An analysis by Legal & General of reasons for calling the government’s pilot Occupational Health Advice Lines found that stress, followed by back pain and depression, was the most common condition prompting enquiry. The findings complement recent DWP research which found that only 17 per cent of employers have any form of stress management, despite it being a leading cause of workplace absence. Coaching at Work, Volume 7, Issue 5

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