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News: Lack of preparation stalls cross-cultural mentoring

Many multinational mentoring programmes are at risk because employers fail to think strategically, adapt their approach to local cultures, or offer participants adequate cross-cultural training beforehand.
These were the key messages emerging from contributions to the multinational mentoring stream in the European Mentoring & Coaching Council’s (EMCC) first ever mentoring e-conference on 16-18 January.
David Clutterbuck, co-founder of the EMCC, said many organisations fail to change. “One of the mistakes I have seen commonly is for the headquarters of a multinational to assume that what works [fits] culturally in the home country is the right way to do it everywhere else. This cultural imperialism often leads to conflict and the abandonment of very effective local programmes.”

Adina Tarry, director of Rich Answers International, who has lived and worked in seven countries, and works with multinationals, said she has never seen a cross-cultural competence development programme precede mentoring, for example. She said businesses have a limited understanding of what cross-cultural experience, awareness, competency and sensitisation are, and do not appreciate that specific preparation is needed.

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News: Mindjet report: demoralised employees lack the willpower to succeed

Employers are struggling to motivate employees because of a lack of resources, recognition and direction from senior colleagues, suggests research. Inefficient communication is also a factor in holding people back, suggests the report from software company Mindjet. More than half of British office workers care about their employer succeeding in 2013, but only 49 per cent take their own role in this success seriously. And although a third (33 per cent) think they need to change their everyday working practices to be more successful, 24 per cent say they “haven’t got round to it” and 19 per cent feel too […]

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News: ‘Sloppy work’ is biggest timewaster

Half of UK employees feel their employer doesn’t help them develop good team working skills, suggests a survey of 2,000 people by training consultancy Cedar. Employees understand their own work contributes to team targets, but one-fifth have never attended a meeting in which team performance was discussed. Four in ten have a manager “who does not assist in resolving conflicts”. This, along with difficult interpersonal relationships within teams, is taking its toll on the team’s overall performance. A third of respondents dread coming into work because of a bad team environment, while a further third believe a tense atmosphere is […]

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News:Executive coaching spreads its net wide

US-based Sherpa’s latest annual survey reveals the value and credibility of coaching is at an all-time high, spreading across the globe and creating corporate cultures

This is the year that high-definition video made its mark on coaching, while the number of practitioners using face-to-face coaching fell for the first time in eight years, according to a global survey.
Webcam, a technology that was hardly mentioned even five years ago, is now an important component of service delivery, with 15 per cent of practitioners using it to coach, according to Sherpa’s eighth annual survey – Executive Coaching at the Summit (www.sherpacoaching.com).
The use of video-conferencing is also rising dramatically. External coaches use it more often than internals, by a 22 per cent to 20 per cent margin. And as live, high-quality video starts to become widely available, it will overtake other delivery methods, predicts the report.
Some 92 per cent of internal coaches see face-to-face coaching as the most effective method of delivery, compared to 76 per cent of externals.
The report has thrown up other differences between how external and internal coaches operate, too. Internal coaches meet their clients more often and have more face-to-face meetings – more than half of internals’ coaching is in person, compared to just 40 per cent of externals’ services, the survey notes.
Internal coaches are twice as likely to have weekly meetings, and strongly favour shorter engagements (90 days or less.) Some 27 per cent of externals believe a coaching engagement should last six months or longer, while only 7 per cent of internal coaches opt for engagements that long.

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Bring back joy

Unprofessional, fluffy? The idea of mixing mindfulness with ‘hard’ business has faced a difficult press. But the tide is turning, including within coaching. Mindful coach, Liz Hall, shares the results of her Mindfulness in Coaching 2012 survey and other research. Meditation used to be seen by many as the preserve of hippies and ochre-robed monks, not fit for the tough, hard-nosed corporate world. Coaches with meditation practices, myself included, would steer clear of mixing mindfulness with business, for fear of being branded unprofessional or fluffy. But this is changing. Mindfulness is being embraced in a number of secular settings, such […]

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Welcome to the January 2013 issue of the newsletter

Welcome to the January 2013 issue of the newsletter And so another year begins, with snow in the UK, a helicopter crashing in London and not much in the way of economic recovery in much of the world. The UK economy contracted by 0.3% in the last three months of 2012, according to the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR). And here in Spain, where I’m currently based, the second EU bailout of 1.865 million euros is set to arrive by the end of the month. Some six million are out of work, many of my friends received […]

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Welcome to the October 2012 issue of the newsletter

Welcome to the October 2012 issue of the newsletter I’m filing this newsletter from Kansas University’s Global Summit on Coaching, in Lawrence. The town was established in 1854 by anti-slavery advocates and saw much bloodshed when it became a target for the nearby Missouri-based pro-slavery faction. Campaigning for change runs deep in its veins. And today too, Lawrence is a site for innovation. The Kansas Coaching Project, headed up by Jim Knight, has pioneered ‘instructional coaching’ (IC) in the field of education. Described as “on-site professional developers who teach educators how to use proven instructional methods,” Knight admits instructional coaches […]

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HOW TO… COACH GENERATION Y

By BARBARA ST.CLAIRE-OSTWALD

Like any other generational group, Gen Y is uniquely shaped by its historical context. It is only by understanding, respecting and addressing such generational differences in the working environment, that coaches can establish a successful relationship.

There is no consensus on the exact birthdate of Generation Y (Gen Y), but various publications and research studies give it as between 1982 and 2002 (Baby Boomers: 1946-1963, Gen X: 1963-1977 and late Gen X: 1977-1982).

Each generational group has a distinct set of values: how they view authority, their orientation to the world, loyalty, expectations of their leadership and ideal work environment. Each is uniquely shaped by its historical context. These formative influences have enduring effects and bring something new to the workforce, underscoring our need to understand, respect and regularly address generational differences in working practices.

Gen Y at work

A major challenge is an apparent mismatch between what employers want – and the world can offer – and what Gen Y want to do

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News in brief: Stress busters

Work-related stress is the most common reason that employers seek occupational health advice, according to statistics compiled by the UK’s Department for Work and Pensions (DWP). An analysis by Legal & General of reasons for calling the government’s pilot Occupational Health Advice Lines found that stress, followed by back pain and depression, was the most common condition prompting enquiry. The findings complement recent DWP research which found that only 17 per cent of employers have any form of stress management, despite it being a leading cause of workplace absence. Coaching at Work, Volume 7, Issue 5

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Welcome to the June 2012 issue of the newsletter

Welcome to the June 2012 issue of the newsletter Prompted by neuroscientist Geoff Bird’s suggestion at our last conference that coaches and clients might start sniffing bonding hormone oxytocin before sessions, we asked you what you thought. Some 94% of you voted against, in our online poll. We have another keynote on neuroscience in our second conference next month (July)- Chris Samsa will be talking about neuroscience and positive psychology. The conference is now sold out, weeks before the event, just like our last one. The conference sponsors this year are: Gold: Insala; Silver: Centre for Coaching; The CoachOnline, EMCC, […]

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Disability special report

In this three-part report, we look at how coaching can be used to support disabled people. Two coaches and their clients – one a deaf UK-based coach and the other a Greece-based coach with no disabilities – share their experiences and reflections. And David Clutterbuck offers guidance on using mentoring with disabled people PART ONE : MISSED ABILITY? Disabled people are just like other people. Why offer them particular support as a group? The short answer is because it could help unearth talents that employers are unaware of, says deaf coach, Jane Cordell When I started coaching in 2008, it was […]

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Embracing and Enabling Change – Speakers

Home Programme Keynote sessions Case studies Workshops Conference Material Sponsors Booking Speakers Aboodi Shabi Aboodi Shabi is one of the UK’s most senior coaches, and a pioneer and leader in the UK and European Coaching community. He was a founding co-President of the UK ICF, and has served the profession at all levels internationally. He has worked in the field of personal development for over twenty years, and in coaching since 1996. In that time, he has worked with thousands of coaches across the world. Aboodi has led training for coaches across Europe, and in Asia, North America and South […]

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