BECAUSE I CAN: A PROFILE OF GILL SMITH

Gill Smith has worked tirelessly as chair of the Association for Coaching UK. She continues to live purposefully, despite her recent cancer diagnosis   Gill SmithBy Liz Hall Sharp, tenacious, hard-working, warm, inspiring, a consummate professional – these are just some of the ways Gill Smith, the Association for Coaching (AC) UK’s chair for the past […]

PROFILE: MY WORK IN PROGRESS

Eve Turner loves her coaching and coach supervision, and she has won many awards for her work. But, she tells Liz Hall, what matters most to her is making a difference to individuals, teams – and beyond   Award-winning coach and coach supervisor Eve Turner isn’t one to do things by halves, and readily acknowledges […]

PROFILE: OUT OF AFRICA

Ugandan-born Anthony Kasozi fled his country when he was 16. The experience taught him resilience and independence, he tells Liz Hall, and he’s been on a rich learning journey as a leadership coach ever since   Leadership coach, consultant and adviser Anthony Kasozi says he doesn’t like talking about himself. But thankfully he obliges, with […]

DON’T CALL ME HAPPY

Positivity Institute founder Suzy Green explains why positive psychology is all about enhancing resilience, achievement and wellbeing – but not about happiness. And why coaching is essential in helping build and sustain this approach to positive emotions She jokes that although her main strength is vitality/zest, and she thinks of herself as a positive person, […]

FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE

Academic, active researcher, chartered occupational psychologist, coach and coaching supervisor, Tatiana Bachkirova has a packed professional life. Yet, 20 years ago she arrived in the UK, a shy teacher with very little English. She tells Liz Hall how she finally found her voice

Tatiana Bachkirova is one of the foremost academics and researchers in the coaching profession, unafraid to speak up for what she believes and to challenge where she feels challenge is due. But she hasn’t always been so outspoken.

Before she had cancer, for which she was given the all clear last autumn, her shyness had held her back:

“I am officially a cancer survivor. It was a milestone. Strangely enough, before it I was shy and nervous and hesitant about speaking out and speaking up and being out there, but after that, I lost the fears and thought it’s OK to say what is important for me. The nature of coaching is that you take the hard things and make them into something that could be helpful.”

Bachkirova, Reader in Coaching Psychology at Oxford Brookes University, in the UK, teaching and supervising on its MA and Doctoral programmes in Coaching and Mentoring, believes that the willingness to critique is inherent in the role of the academic.