News: Lack of preparation stalls cross-cultural mentoring

Many multinational mentoring programmes are at risk because employers fail to think strategically, adapt their approach to local cultures, or offer participants adequate cross-cultural training beforehand.
These were the key messages emerging from contributions to the multinational mentoring stream in the European Mentoring & Coaching Council’s (EMCC) first ever mentoring e-conference on 16-18 January.
David Clutterbuck, co-founder of the EMCC, said many organisations fail to change. “One of the mistakes I have seen commonly is for the headquarters of a multinational to assume that what works [fits] culturally in the home country is the right way to do it everywhere else. This cultural imperialism often leads to conflict and the abandonment of very effective local programmes.”

Adina Tarry, director of Rich Answers International, who has lived and worked in seven countries, and works with multinationals, said she has never seen a cross-cultural competence development programme precede mentoring, for example. She said businesses have a limited understanding of what cross-cultural experience, awareness, competency and sensitisation are, and do not appreciate that specific preparation is needed.

News: Coach sails

Clipper world race for H2O children’s charity. Despite never having sailed before, Terezia Koczka, is taking to the high seas in the Clipper Round the World Race to raise funds for charity. Executive coach Koczka is rising to the challenge, both to celebrate her 60th birthday and to encourage support for the H2O programme, which helps gives access to education to disadvantaged children in a rural, poor area of her home country, Hungary. The Clipper race is unique in the sailing world. Apart from the skipper, none of the participants are professional sailors – 40 per cent, like Koczka, have […]

News: Government portal helps SMEs find mentors

A UK government initiative has reached its target – by adding 15,000 more small business mentors to its books. Mentorsme.co.uk, a national mentoring portal owned and operated by the British Bankers’ Association, already had 12,000 mentors from the small business community. Over the past 16 months, it has trained a further 15,000 volunteers, to help SMEs start, grow and create jobs. The mentors have been recruited and trained as part of the £1.9m government-funded Get Mentoring project, delivered by the Small Firms Enterprise Development Initiative (SFEDI). Business minister, Michael Fallon said:
“Small businesses are vital to our economy and we are […]

News: Mindjet report: demoralised employees lack the willpower to succeed

Employers are struggling to motivate employees because of a lack of resources, recognition and direction from senior colleagues, suggests research. Inefficient communication is also a factor in holding people back, suggests the report from software company Mindjet. More than half of British office workers care about their employer succeeding in 2013, but only 49 per cent take their own role in this success seriously. And although a third (33 per cent) think they need to change their everyday working practices to be more successful, 24 per cent say they “haven’t got round to it” and 19 per cent feel too […]

News: Ernst & Young builds relations

Mentoring in the community makes employees better at serving clients, and at managing people, according to an Ernst & Young community engagement champion in the US. Mentoring is a core leadership competency at Ernst & Young, said Rene Salas, Ernst & Young’s East Central assurance partner and community engagement champion. He said, “Mentoring in the community helps employees build relationships that matter – and they learn how to listen, how to coach and how to forge connections based on trust.” Salas, who directs the company region’s charitable giving and volunteerism efforts, was speaking at a networking reception for more than […]

News: ‘Sloppy work’ is biggest timewaster

Half of UK employees feel their employer doesn’t help them develop good team working skills, suggests a survey of 2,000 people by training consultancy Cedar. Employees understand their own work contributes to team targets, but one-fifth have never attended a meeting in which team performance was discussed. Four in ten have a manager “who does not assist in resolving conflicts”. This, along with difficult interpersonal relationships within teams, is taking its toll on the team’s overall performance. A third of respondents dread coming into work because of a bad team environment, while a further third believe a tense atmosphere is […]

News:Executive coaching spreads its net wide

US-based Sherpa’s latest annual survey reveals the value and credibility of coaching is at an all-time high, spreading across the globe and creating corporate cultures

This is the year that high-definition video made its mark on coaching, while the number of practitioners using face-to-face coaching fell for the first time in eight years, according to a global survey.
Webcam, a technology that was hardly mentioned even five years ago, is now an important component of service delivery, with 15 per cent of practitioners using it to coach, according to Sherpa’s eighth annual survey – Executive Coaching at the Summit (www.sherpacoaching.com).
The use of video-conferencing is also rising dramatically. External coaches use it more often than internals, by a 22 per cent to 20 per cent margin. And as live, high-quality video starts to become widely available, it will overtake other delivery methods, predicts the report.
Some 92 per cent of internal coaches see face-to-face coaching as the most effective method of delivery, compared to 76 per cent of externals.
The report has thrown up other differences between how external and internal coaches operate, too. Internal coaches meet their clients more often and have more face-to-face meetings – more than half of internals’ coaching is in person, compared to just 40 per cent of externals’ services, the survey notes.
Internal coaches are twice as likely to have weekly meetings, and strongly favour shorter engagements (90 days or less.) Some 27 per cent of externals believe a coaching engagement should last six months or longer, while only 7 per cent of internal coaches opt for engagements that long.

News: Target-hitting won’t make you feel good at work

It will come as little surprise to many coaches that getting on well with work colleagues and having a good work/life balance are key to feeling good at work. As many coaches used to working on issues concerning emotional intelligence and work/life balance with clients will already suspect, positive relationships and a good work/life balance make all the difference. They are the top two factors in feeling good at work, according to 42 per cent and 40 per cent of workers surveyed, respectively. Some 26 per cent highlight “receiving praise” and 16 per cent, earning the trust of their boss, […]

News: Professor Passmore wins the 2012 SGCP Research Award

Jonathan Passmore has won an accolade for his ground-breaking research into the psychology of coaching within driver learning. Professor Passmore won the 2012 British Psychological Society’s Special Group in Coaching Psychology (SGCP) Research Award for a distinguished research project. The award was given for his research into the psychology of coaching as a learning methodology and safety intervention in learner driving and its subsequent impact on driver training practice in the UK. The research focused on real-world challenges, incorporating beliefs as well as behavioural change through the coaching interventions researched. The collaboration with the driving industry was noted. Two Student […]

Opinion: Ethical frameworks

Ethical frameworks – if only life were that simple by Bob Garvey Many coaching bodies create sets of rules around confidentiality. But if ethics are socially defined, and contextually relevant, how can they be right or wrong? Many professional bodies claim their ethical frameworks reassure potential clients or sponsors, and ensure quality control, standards, accountability and protection. These are bold claims. Given the complex arguments surrounding ethical behaviour, is it possible to deliver on these promises? Are ethical frameworks ethical? Ethics is a moral philosophy in which complex issues of good and evil, right and wrong, justice and injustice, are […]