Posts

Toolbox – tried and tested

A new, occasional column, in which readers share tried and tested tools they’ve invented or adapted. This issue, Eve Turner shares her lift analogy. Looking out, not looking up This tool came about in my early days as a coach. I was working with someone who wanted to apply for a role two grades above their current position. In the major organisation involved, applying in such circumstances was highly unusual, and the chances of success were very limited. We talked about preparation – the normal things you would expect, such as looking at CVs, job descriptions and person specifications; matching […]

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HOW TO… SET UP AND DEVELOP A SUCCESSFUL COACHING PRACTICE

By Gladeana Mcmahon and Antoinette Oglethorpe This is the first in a series of articles aimed at helping coaches deal with the variety of factors associated with setting up a successful coaching practice Part one: Guidelines for coaches starting out in business Many qualified coaches love coaching so much they want to make it their full-time profession. However, being a competent, or even an excellent, coach is not an automatic guarantee of financial success (McMahon, Palmer and Wilding, 2005). Before you set up in business you need to consider three core factors: business acumen, professional expectations and personal need/resilience. Each […]

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Diversity Awareness Ladder

Coaching at Work road-tests the Diversity Awareness Ladder One step at a time 1 The tool What is it? Created by David Clutterbuck, the Diversity Awareness Ladder helps clients and practitioners understand and work with their stereotypes and implicit biases about people they perceive as different from themselves. It has also been used widely in general diversity education. How does it work? The Ladder is a model of two conversations – the inner conversation, which represents instinctive, emotional responses to difference and is not normally spoken out loud; and the outer conversation, which offers a way of engaging with the […]

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We say kia ora…

Coaching that ignores the cultural heritage of non-Westernised clients is ineffective at best. Coaching psychologists in New Zealand understand this and are now required to adapt theories to suit Māori clients. Lisa Stewart reports

Tītmatanga o te matauranga
ko te wahangū,
te wāhanga tuarua ko te whakarongo.

The first stage of learning is silence,
the second stage is listening.

Māori Whakataukī (proverb)

Most coaches and coaching psychologists would agree it is important to adapt our theories and methods to suit our clients, and to respect and value their cultural world views and ways of being. But how often do we do this? In New Zealand, such adaptation is required for coaching psychologists. The New Zealand Psychologists Board1 acknowledges that “the practice of psychology in Aotearoa New Zealand reflects paradigms and world views of both partners to te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi”.

Registered psychologists (including coaching psychologists) must demonstrate “awareness and knowledge of their own cultural identity, values and practices”, and those of their clients – especially of Māori (the indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand) as their Treaty partner. One of the reasons for this approach is to reduce the persistently poorer socio-economic, justice, health and employment outcomes for Māoris.

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Quality assured

Against the backdrop of sweeping changes in the NHS, clients are reporting increased ability to manage organisational change, among other benefits, according to ongoing evaluation, say Sue Mortlock and Alison Carter The UK’s National Health Service (NHS) has invested significantly in its executive coach register over the past seven years, in order to quality assure the external executive coaches it uses to coach its senior leaders. The rigorous recruitment to the register has been well-documented (Coaching at Work, vol 5, issue 1). What is less well-known is the work undertaken to evaluate the impact of the coaching this register undertakes. […]

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Keep your distance

Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn? Social media platforms are such an integral part of modern lives that clients are crying out for a more flexible approach to coaching. Kate Anthony describes the benefits of online coaching. The use of technology to deliver therapeutic services has increased substantially over the past 15 years, yet coaching at a distance has had a surprisingly small uptake. Jennifer Baker of TheCoachOnline says: “The coach’s main concern is about losing the personal one-to-one interaction. Some coaches are not seeing the opportunity of how to use the Internet as a tool to enhance their business.” The rise […]

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The remotest idea

Viewpoint Dr Suzanne Edinger How can virtual teams forge relationships without ever meeting? Perhaps coaching can bridge the gap. In my current research, I am investigating the role of different types of relationships among remote members of a virtual team – who don’t meet face to face – and also with their leaders, and how these particular relationships might lead to better team performance. If there’s no chance of members meeting in a single physical location, then trust and connection between those team members becomes particularly important. Of course, building trust among members is a key issue in any team. […]

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The big picture

In the second in a series on systemic coaching, John Blakey explains why we need to go beyond traditional coaching to engage with the larger systemic issues of our time – so we can become interconnected When Ian Day and I published our first book, Where Were All the Coaches When the Banks Went Down? two years ago, it provoked some debate in coaching circles. Its title alone appeared to polarise the coaching community into two camps – one which saw it as an arrogant claim that coaches could have prevented the crisis by thinking we were more important than […]

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Power up

Tired? Weary? Retreat coaching is beginning to gain ground as a way of helping clients recharge and re-evaluate their health, values and beliefs. Retreat coach Dorothy Larios creates time and space for her clients on coaching retreats. The age-old practice of retreating and connecting with self and source is the most valuable gift one can give oneself or someone who is tired and weary, says certified retreat coach Dorothy Larios. Coaches are well placed to offer this. “There is much to experience in the practice of retreating safely. Modern-day coaches can become well-equipped to meet the needs of those who […]

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How to… Coach for mental toughness: part 2

Most people know what it’s like to have a ‘poor’ attention span. They also know that it’s hard to stop doing favourite tasks. In the final part of this series, Peter Clough and Doug Strycharczyk consider how to improve performance through better concentration. Research and feedback from practitioners shows that the most useful interventions for developing mental toughness fall under five broad headings: positive thinking, visualisation, anxiety control, goal setting and attentional control. The latter, which is about focusing better and for longer, is one of the least exploited areas of intervention, yet it has the most scope for significant […]

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