Posts

Toolbox – tried and tested

A new, occasional column, in which readers share tried and tested tools they’ve invented or adapted. This issue, Eve Turner shares her lift analogy. Looking out, not looking up This tool came about in my early days as a coach. I was working with someone who wanted to apply for a role two grades above their current position. In the major organisation involved, applying in such circumstances was highly unusual, and the chances of success were very limited. We talked about preparation – the normal things you would expect, such as looking at CVs, job descriptions and person specifications; matching […]

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HOW TO… SET UP AND DEVELOP A SUCCESSFUL COACHING PRACTICE

By Gladeana Mcmahon and Antoinette Oglethorpe This is the first in a series of articles aimed at helping coaches deal with the variety of factors associated with setting up a successful coaching practice Part one: Guidelines for coaches starting out in business Many qualified coaches love coaching so much they want to make it their full-time profession. However, being a competent, or even an excellent, coach is not an automatic guarantee of financial success (McMahon, Palmer and Wilding, 2005). Before you set up in business you need to consider three core factors: business acumen, professional expectations and personal need/resilience. Each […]

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Welcome to the November 2012 issue of the newsletter

Welcome to the November 2012 issue of the newsletter I’ve just returned from the annual European Mentoring & Coaching Council’s conference in Bilbao in Spain, home to one of the Guggenheim museums. I was struck by how architect Frank Gehry has succeeded in creating a structure which is innovative and surprising yet which blends in beautifully with its environment- from the shallow moat which gives the impression it is part of the river, to the many curves and sheets of metal which reflect light and the structure’s surroundings. Within its walls are numerous galleries including one exhibiting Egon Schiele- further […]

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Welcome to the October 2012 issue of the newsletter

Welcome to the October 2012 issue of the newsletter I’m filing this newsletter from Kansas University’s Global Summit on Coaching, in Lawrence. The town was established in 1854 by anti-slavery advocates and saw much bloodshed when it became a target for the nearby Missouri-based pro-slavery faction. Campaigning for change runs deep in its veins. And today too, Lawrence is a site for innovation. The Kansas Coaching Project, headed up by Jim Knight, has pioneered ‘instructional coaching’ (IC) in the field of education. Described as “on-site professional developers who teach educators how to use proven instructional methods,” Knight admits instructional coaches […]

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The Coaching Chronicles: James VI and I

Hello, I am Roach the Coach and I am your guide through the Coaching Chronicles. There are 4,500 species of us cockroaches so we are well placed, across the globe, and across time, to tell you about coaching… James succeeded his mother, Mary Queen of Scots, to the throne at the ripe old age of 13 months. As a slightly naive King, it became clear that he was going to need a lot of support, mentoring and coaching to help him accelerate his regal skills. The care of James was entrusted to the Earl and Countess of Mar – a […]

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HOW TO… COACH GENERATION Y

By BARBARA ST.CLAIRE-OSTWALD

Like any other generational group, Gen Y is uniquely shaped by its historical context. It is only by understanding, respecting and addressing such generational differences in the working environment, that coaches can establish a successful relationship.

There is no consensus on the exact birthdate of Generation Y (Gen Y), but various publications and research studies give it as between 1982 and 2002 (Baby Boomers: 1946-1963, Gen X: 1963-1977 and late Gen X: 1977-1982).

Each generational group has a distinct set of values: how they view authority, their orientation to the world, loyalty, expectations of their leadership and ideal work environment. Each is uniquely shaped by its historical context. These formative influences have enduring effects and bring something new to the workforce, underscoring our need to understand, respect and regularly address generational differences in working practices.

Gen Y at work

A major challenge is an apparent mismatch between what employers want – and the world can offer – and what Gen Y want to do

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The health coaching toolkit, part four

Part 4: health coaching expert Professor Stephen Palmer expands on cognitive behavioural health coaching. This issue: cognitive thinking skills

Thinking skills help a client develop Health Enhancing Thinking (HETs). Some health-inhibiting styles of thinking develop over many years and become ingrained and resistant to change. In specific situations, such as smelling one’s favourite fatty food, the client need only think, “That smells great. I must have it now”, and next thing, they are eating it! Or with tasks they fail at, instead of thinking, “I’ve failed to reach my health goals today, I’ll have another go tomorrow”, they have a more unhelpful ending to their Health Inhibiting Thinking (HITs): “I’ve failed to reach my health goals today; this proves I’m a total failure.”

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The stress professor

World-renowned counselling and coaching psychologist, founder of the Centre for Stress Management, Centre for Coaching and the Coaching Psychology Unit, Professor Stephen Palmer’s boundless energy has helped add many strings to his bow – just don’t put him in a box, he tells Liz Hall

As we talk, Stephen Palmer watches tanker ships on the horizon, waves crashing against the walls on the beach below his house in Cornwall. Other times he might see dolphins. But “always there’s the sound of the sea, which I love”.

Palmer is well-known globally for contributions to coaching psychology, stress management and Cognitive Behavioural Coaching (CBC). He’s known for his involvement in many projects and professional bodies, and for his high energy levels. The artistic, reflective and nature-loving side is less well-known.

Palmer does have fingers in many pies. Even in Cornwall, where he comes to reflect and to write, he is very productive. He has written and edited more than 40 books and more than 225 articles. He also produces seascape-inspired semi-abstract paintings and often explores the coastline.

Mind and body
Biology is one of many recurring and long-standing interests in Palmer’s life and work. Psychology is another. He’s been interested in human behaviour since childhood.

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Learning providers must stop ‘patronising’ SMEs

We have been “barking up the wrong tree for years” with our business education models, according to Bob Garvey. At his inaugural lecture on 31 October for his chair in Business Education at York St John Business School, Professor Garvey was set to challenge current frameworks for learning delivered by most providers in the market. His lecture, ‘Learning Business’, shared an alternative model of business education based on conversational learning. He said, “There can be little doubt that those that learn the fastest in business are often the most successful. But SME business leaders are often patronised by public and […]

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News: Why do your clients trust you?

HENLEY ANNUAL COACHING CONFERENCE, HENLEY BUSINESS SCHOOL, 22 JUNE, 2012 Why do your clients trust you? By Kate McGuire The importance of trust in coaching relationships was a hot topic at the Henley Coaching conference on 22 June. Malcolm Higgs, professor of organisation behaviour at Southampton University’s School of Management, and an external examiner for Henley, described two areas: an individual’s assessment of another’s trustworthiness, and their propensity to trust. Higgs argued that propensity to trust consists of three elements: the belief that others are likely to act in a trustworthy way; the extent to which others can be relied […]

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