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Into Bulgaria

Post-Communist Bulgaria may not be the first country you’d associate with world-class leadership, yet International Coach Federation Bulgaria co-founders Peter Goryalov and Irina Goryalova are spearheading some remarkable changes

To say that Peter Goryalov and Irina Goryalova have got coaching off the ground in Bulgaria is an understatement. They won the International Coach Federation (ICF) President’s Award for their leadership and contribution to coaching and the ICF in Bulgaria in September 2011, and their chapter won the ICF’s Breaking Barriers Award in 2012, along with Australia’s Victoria chapter for a joint project.

They’re launching one trailblazing executive coaching initiative after another, they’ve been interviewed widely in Bulgaria, and former prominent journalist Irina has had more than 20 ground-breaking articles published, establishing a new language for leaders and organisations.

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The health coaching toolkit, part 5

Part 5: health coaching expert Professor Stephen Palmer, and Professor Cary Cooper and Kate Thomas, examine multimodal health coaching

Multimodal health coaching can be used for a wide range of health-related issues, such as undertaking and maintaining exercise programmes, weight management, stop smoking, managing stress, enhancing resilience and alcohol reduction.
It is also a useful approach to assist clients who relapse, which often occurs when they become stressed. For example, many of us will use comfort eating or drinking to help us cope with work overload, and this can increase our calorific intake, yet we are too busy to counter this by taking more exercise.
This is not very useful if you want to maintain your existing body weight, especially as our choice of comfort food, when stressed, can be of a high calorific value.
Others, when stressed, will either start smoking again or smoke more if they have not already stopped. Not surprisingly, this can have a negative impact on their health coaching programme. In these cases, it may be preferable to have a more comprehensive understanding of the different issues that may be having an impact on the client. The multimodal approach, originally developed by Arnold Lazarus, literally takes us back to basics, where the coach assesses the different factors involved.

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Play your part

In a previous issue of Coaching at Work, Tatiana Bachkirova argued that supervision should be our professional conscience in practice and be non-mandatory. Experienced coach supervisor Nicola Haskins disagrees Not enough coaches are coming into supervision – and it’s something the industry is, rightly, concerned about. The recent explosive growth in supervisor training programmes and publications on coaching supervision, will certainly increase the pool of supervisors and heighten general awareness of it. But I don’t believe this will be enough to get coaches into supervision. What is needed is a three-pronged strategy to: demonstrate the benefits of coaching supervision mandate […]

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HOW TO… SET UP AND DEVELOP A SUCCESSFUL COACHING PRACTICE

By Gladeana Mcmahon and Antoinette Oglethorpe This is the first in a series of articles aimed at helping coaches deal with the variety of factors associated with setting up a successful coaching practice Part one: Guidelines for coaches starting out in business Many qualified coaches love coaching so much they want to make it their full-time profession. However, being a competent, or even an excellent, coach is not an automatic guarantee of financial success (McMahon, Palmer and Wilding, 2005). Before you set up in business you need to consider three core factors: business acumen, professional expectations and personal need/resilience. Each […]

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Welcome to the November 2012 issue of the newsletter

Welcome to the November 2012 issue of the newsletter I’ve just returned from the annual European Mentoring & Coaching Council’s conference in Bilbao in Spain, home to one of the Guggenheim museums. I was struck by how architect Frank Gehry has succeeded in creating a structure which is innovative and surprising yet which blends in beautifully with its environment- from the shallow moat which gives the impression it is part of the river, to the many curves and sheets of metal which reflect light and the structure’s surroundings. Within its walls are numerous galleries including one exhibiting Egon Schiele- further […]

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Who is setting the goalposts?

How do psychologists view goals in coaching? David Megginson, emeritus professor of HRD, Coaching & Mentoring Research Unit, Sheffield Hallam University, finds some unlikely alliances of opinion I’m co-writing a book on goals in coaching, and we have some great contributors from psychology and development offering their own views. What do psychologists who are authors of coaching books say about goals in coaching? This is what I discovered. Organisation agenda Peltier and Lee were two of the earliest coaching psychology books I read. Both drew attention to unconscious processes and opened my eyes to the possibilities of their influencing coaching […]

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We say kia ora…

Coaching that ignores the cultural heritage of non-Westernised clients is ineffective at best. Coaching psychologists in New Zealand understand this and are now required to adapt theories to suit Māori clients. Lisa Stewart reports

Tītmatanga o te matauranga
ko te wahangū,
te wāhanga tuarua ko te whakarongo.

The first stage of learning is silence,
the second stage is listening.

Māori Whakataukī (proverb)

Most coaches and coaching psychologists would agree it is important to adapt our theories and methods to suit our clients, and to respect and value their cultural world views and ways of being. But how often do we do this? In New Zealand, such adaptation is required for coaching psychologists. The New Zealand Psychologists Board1 acknowledges that “the practice of psychology in Aotearoa New Zealand reflects paradigms and world views of both partners to te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi”.

Registered psychologists (including coaching psychologists) must demonstrate “awareness and knowledge of their own cultural identity, values and practices”, and those of their clients – especially of Māori (the indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand) as their Treaty partner. One of the reasons for this approach is to reduce the persistently poorer socio-economic, justice, health and employment outcomes for Māoris.

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The health coaching toolkit, part four

Part 4: health coaching expert Professor Stephen Palmer expands on cognitive behavioural health coaching. This issue: cognitive thinking skills

Thinking skills help a client develop Health Enhancing Thinking (HETs). Some health-inhibiting styles of thinking develop over many years and become ingrained and resistant to change. In specific situations, such as smelling one’s favourite fatty food, the client need only think, “That smells great. I must have it now”, and next thing, they are eating it! Or with tasks they fail at, instead of thinking, “I’ve failed to reach my health goals today, I’ll have another go tomorrow”, they have a more unhelpful ending to their Health Inhibiting Thinking (HITs): “I’ve failed to reach my health goals today; this proves I’m a total failure.”

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Running mate

Politicians come from all walks of life and get little training for their complex, often combative, decision-making roles. Elke Esders explains how systemic coaching can bring much-needed clarity to their work. “What are you coaching?” It’s what most people in politics ask me when I tell them I’m a coach, possibly mistaking it for some form of training. Coaching has yet to really reach the political arena. There are several reasons: lack of knowledge, constant time pressure in a job that can take over your life and lack of institutional support in encouraging and financing it. In my dual capacity […]

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Keep your distance

Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn? Social media platforms are such an integral part of modern lives that clients are crying out for a more flexible approach to coaching. Kate Anthony describes the benefits of online coaching. The use of technology to deliver therapeutic services has increased substantially over the past 15 years, yet coaching at a distance has had a surprisingly small uptake. Jennifer Baker of TheCoachOnline says: “The coach’s main concern is about losing the personal one-to-one interaction. Some coaches are not seeing the opportunity of how to use the Internet as a tool to enhance their business.” The rise […]

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