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Book One Title: Coaching and Mentoring: A Critical Text Author: Simon Western Publisher: SAGE Publications ISBN 978 1848 60164 2 Usefulness ***** This is a rich tapestry of a book – comparable in complexity to Erik de Haan’s Relational Coaching. Whereas de Haan majors on systematic research, Western’s strength is in the depth of his professional and personal insight. I recommend this book to anyone who thinks they occupy a secure niche in coaching. If you believe your therapeutic model helps you heal the wounded self of your clients, or if you use positive thinking to boost self-esteem, be ready […]

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Welcome to the November 2012 issue of the newsletter

Welcome to the November 2012 issue of the newsletter I’ve just returned from the annual European Mentoring & Coaching Council’s conference in Bilbao in Spain, home to one of the Guggenheim museums. I was struck by how architect Frank Gehry has succeeded in creating a structure which is innovative and surprising yet which blends in beautifully with its environment- from the shallow moat which gives the impression it is part of the river, to the many curves and sheets of metal which reflect light and the structure’s surroundings. Within its walls are numerous galleries including one exhibiting Egon Schiele- further […]

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The Coaching Chronicles: James VI and I

Hello, I am Roach the Coach and I am your guide through the Coaching Chronicles. There are 4,500 species of us cockroaches so we are well placed, across the globe, and across time, to tell you about coaching… James succeeded his mother, Mary Queen of Scots, to the throne at the ripe old age of 13 months. As a slightly naive King, it became clear that he was going to need a lot of support, mentoring and coaching to help him accelerate his regal skills. The care of James was entrusted to the Earl and Countess of Mar – a […]

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Cracking the glass ceiling

Mentoring In the latest in a series of columns dedicated to mentoring, we look at designing mentoring to support women talent. This issue: a women-only programme Cracking the glass ceiling Lis Merrick and Paul Stokes Support your organisation’s female talent by setting up a women-only mentoring programme In the last issue we looked at how you can flex mentoring approaches to support your organisational talent. Supporting women talent requires a further lens on how you look at your talent mentoring design. So, building on last issue’s ideas, here is some advice for a women-only programme. In our initial experience of […]

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HOW TO… COACH GENERATION Y

By BARBARA ST.CLAIRE-OSTWALD

Like any other generational group, Gen Y is uniquely shaped by its historical context. It is only by understanding, respecting and addressing such generational differences in the working environment, that coaches can establish a successful relationship.

There is no consensus on the exact birthdate of Generation Y (Gen Y), but various publications and research studies give it as between 1982 and 2002 (Baby Boomers: 1946-1963, Gen X: 1963-1977 and late Gen X: 1977-1982).

Each generational group has a distinct set of values: how they view authority, their orientation to the world, loyalty, expectations of their leadership and ideal work environment. Each is uniquely shaped by its historical context. These formative influences have enduring effects and bring something new to the workforce, underscoring our need to understand, respect and regularly address generational differences in working practices.

Gen Y at work

A major challenge is an apparent mismatch between what employers want – and the world can offer – and what Gen Y want to do

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Diversity Awareness Ladder

Coaching at Work road-tests the Diversity Awareness Ladder One step at a time 1 The tool What is it? Created by David Clutterbuck, the Diversity Awareness Ladder helps clients and practitioners understand and work with their stereotypes and implicit biases about people they perceive as different from themselves. It has also been used widely in general diversity education. How does it work? The Ladder is a model of two conversations – the inner conversation, which represents instinctive, emotional responses to difference and is not normally spoken out loud; and the outer conversation, which offers a way of engaging with the […]

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We say kia ora…

Coaching that ignores the cultural heritage of non-Westernised clients is ineffective at best. Coaching psychologists in New Zealand understand this and are now required to adapt theories to suit Māori clients. Lisa Stewart reports

Tītmatanga o te matauranga
ko te wahangū,
te wāhanga tuarua ko te whakarongo.

The first stage of learning is silence,
the second stage is listening.

Māori Whakataukī (proverb)

Most coaches and coaching psychologists would agree it is important to adapt our theories and methods to suit our clients, and to respect and value their cultural world views and ways of being. But how often do we do this? In New Zealand, such adaptation is required for coaching psychologists. The New Zealand Psychologists Board1 acknowledges that “the practice of psychology in Aotearoa New Zealand reflects paradigms and world views of both partners to te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi”.

Registered psychologists (including coaching psychologists) must demonstrate “awareness and knowledge of their own cultural identity, values and practices”, and those of their clients – especially of Māori (the indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand) as their Treaty partner. One of the reasons for this approach is to reduce the persistently poorer socio-economic, justice, health and employment outcomes for Māoris.

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Running mate

Politicians come from all walks of life and get little training for their complex, often combative, decision-making roles. Elke Esders explains how systemic coaching can bring much-needed clarity to their work. “What are you coaching?” It’s what most people in politics ask me when I tell them I’m a coach, possibly mistaking it for some form of training. Coaching has yet to really reach the political arena. There are several reasons: lack of knowledge, constant time pressure in a job that can take over your life and lack of institutional support in encouraging and financing it. In my dual capacity […]

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Keep your distance

Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn? Social media platforms are such an integral part of modern lives that clients are crying out for a more flexible approach to coaching. Kate Anthony describes the benefits of online coaching. The use of technology to deliver therapeutic services has increased substantially over the past 15 years, yet coaching at a distance has had a surprisingly small uptake. Jennifer Baker of TheCoachOnline says: “The coach’s main concern is about losing the personal one-to-one interaction. Some coaches are not seeing the opportunity of how to use the Internet as a tool to enhance their business.” The rise […]

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How low can you go?

Persistent and widespread poor self-confidence is proving a major problem for one consumer goods firm. Coaching has worked before, but the problem is creeping back. What next for its HR manager? Harry is a senior-level HR practitioner in a large, fast-moving consumer goods organisation. The business has an ongoing problem of low self-confidence among staff, marked by a wide range of unproductive attitudes, feelings and behaviours. When setbacks or failures occur, staff confidence often buckles, which becomes an insidious and challenging source of interference to effective performance and wellbeing. The individuals demonstrate self-doubt, indecisiveness, isolation, disengagement and frustration, resulting in […]

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