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Welcome to the November 2012 issue of the newsletter

Welcome to the November 2012 issue of the newsletter I’ve just returned from the annual European Mentoring & Coaching Council’s conference in Bilbao in Spain, home to one of the Guggenheim museums. I was struck by how architect Frank Gehry has succeeded in creating a structure which is innovative and surprising yet which blends in beautifully with its environment- from the shallow moat which gives the impression it is part of the river, to the many curves and sheets of metal which reflect light and the structure’s surroundings. Within its walls are numerous galleries including one exhibiting Egon Schiele- further […]

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Welcome to the October 2012 issue of the newsletter

Welcome to the October 2012 issue of the newsletter I’m filing this newsletter from Kansas University’s Global Summit on Coaching, in Lawrence. The town was established in 1854 by anti-slavery advocates and saw much bloodshed when it became a target for the nearby Missouri-based pro-slavery faction. Campaigning for change runs deep in its veins. And today too, Lawrence is a site for innovation. The Kansas Coaching Project, headed up by Jim Knight, has pioneered ‘instructional coaching’ (IC) in the field of education. Described as “on-site professional developers who teach educators how to use proven instructional methods,” Knight admits instructional coaches […]

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Diversity Awareness Ladder

Coaching at Work road-tests the Diversity Awareness Ladder One step at a time 1 The tool What is it? Created by David Clutterbuck, the Diversity Awareness Ladder helps clients and practitioners understand and work with their stereotypes and implicit biases about people they perceive as different from themselves. It has also been used widely in general diversity education. How does it work? The Ladder is a model of two conversations – the inner conversation, which represents instinctive, emotional responses to difference and is not normally spoken out loud; and the outer conversation, which offers a way of engaging with the […]

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We say kia ora…

Coaching that ignores the cultural heritage of non-Westernised clients is ineffective at best. Coaching psychologists in New Zealand understand this and are now required to adapt theories to suit Māori clients. Lisa Stewart reports

Tītmatanga o te matauranga
ko te wahangū,
te wāhanga tuarua ko te whakarongo.

The first stage of learning is silence,
the second stage is listening.

Māori Whakataukī (proverb)

Most coaches and coaching psychologists would agree it is important to adapt our theories and methods to suit our clients, and to respect and value their cultural world views and ways of being. But how often do we do this? In New Zealand, such adaptation is required for coaching psychologists. The New Zealand Psychologists Board1 acknowledges that “the practice of psychology in Aotearoa New Zealand reflects paradigms and world views of both partners to te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi”.

Registered psychologists (including coaching psychologists) must demonstrate “awareness and knowledge of their own cultural identity, values and practices”, and those of their clients – especially of Māori (the indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand) as their Treaty partner. One of the reasons for this approach is to reduce the persistently poorer socio-economic, justice, health and employment outcomes for Māoris.

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Quality assured

Against the backdrop of sweeping changes in the NHS, clients are reporting increased ability to manage organisational change, among other benefits, according to ongoing evaluation, say Sue Mortlock and Alison Carter The UK’s National Health Service (NHS) has invested significantly in its executive coach register over the past seven years, in order to quality assure the external executive coaches it uses to coach its senior leaders. The rigorous recruitment to the register has been well-documented (Coaching at Work, vol 5, issue 1). What is less well-known is the work undertaken to evaluate the impact of the coaching this register undertakes. […]

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The stress professor

World-renowned counselling and coaching psychologist, founder of the Centre for Stress Management, Centre for Coaching and the Coaching Psychology Unit, Professor Stephen Palmer’s boundless energy has helped add many strings to his bow – just don’t put him in a box, he tells Liz Hall

As we talk, Stephen Palmer watches tanker ships on the horizon, waves crashing against the walls on the beach below his house in Cornwall. Other times he might see dolphins. But “always there’s the sound of the sea, which I love”.

Palmer is well-known globally for contributions to coaching psychology, stress management and Cognitive Behavioural Coaching (CBC). He’s known for his involvement in many projects and professional bodies, and for his high energy levels. The artistic, reflective and nature-loving side is less well-known.

Palmer does have fingers in many pies. Even in Cornwall, where he comes to reflect and to write, he is very productive. He has written and edited more than 40 books and more than 225 articles. He also produces seascape-inspired semi-abstract paintings and often explores the coastline.

Mind and body
Biology is one of many recurring and long-standing interests in Palmer’s life and work. Psychology is another. He’s been interested in human behaviour since childhood.

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The remotest idea

Viewpoint Dr Suzanne Edinger How can virtual teams forge relationships without ever meeting? Perhaps coaching can bridge the gap. In my current research, I am investigating the role of different types of relationships among remote members of a virtual team – who don’t meet face to face – and also with their leaders, and how these particular relationships might lead to better team performance. If there’s no chance of members meeting in a single physical location, then trust and connection between those team members becomes particularly important. Of course, building trust among members is a key issue in any team. […]

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Prism award: everyone deserves great leaders

International coach federation global conference, 3-6 October 2012, london The return on investment for introducing coaching within a management development programme is 87.6 per cent at the United Nations Secretariat, delegates heard. The organisation won the International Coach Federation (ICF) Prism award, along with Banner Health and Roche Turkey. Staff engagement at Roche Turkey has gone up by 20 per cent, thanks to its coaching strategy. The establishment of a coaching culture at Roche began two years ago, said internal coach Mustah Zarlari, and has seen more people promoted internally. Zarlari said the number of assignments overseas has increased: “I […]

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CIPD report: Asia raises skills through coaching

By Liz Hall Coaching and mentoring are gaining prominence as ways to raise skills in Asia, according to a report by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development and the Hong Kong Institute of Human Resource Management. Coaching and mentoring are the most cited methods of raising skills (57 per cent of respondents). Raising skills is a priority for 88 per cent of 1,088 respondent organisations from across Hong Kong, China, South Korea, Malaysia, Singapore and Taiwan. Meanwhile, coaching by line managers is considered the most effective learning and development approach (32 per cent), followed by in-house development programmes (29 […]

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NEWS IN BRIEF

Under pressure Workers in the UK believe middle managers and junior level staff are under more pressure than CEOs and senior executives, according to a study of more than 1,500 UK employees. The study, by OnePoll for consultancy Lane4, found that 48 per cent of workers feel under pressure at work while two-fifths feel they’re under severe stress. Some 91 per cent of workers feel most workplace stress falls on middle management, with some of the stress trickling down to the most junior employees. Twenty per cent of the latter believe they are under extreme pressure. Diverse ways ‘Indirect methods’, […]

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