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COACHING AT WORK ANNUAL CONFERENCE, LONDON, UK, 4 JULY 2018 – AID SECTOR PILOTS INTER-AGENCY ONLINE MENTORING

by Jackee Holder WaterAid, British Red Cross, Christian Aid, Save the Children, CAFOD, Plan International, UNHCR, Unicef, War Child and World Vision are taking part in a cross-organisational online mentoring programme to support leadership and management development in the humanitarian sector, the first of its kind. The programme was the brainchild of the humanitarian capacity building team at Save the Children UK, which recognised the importance of mentoring at all levels for personal and professional development. Save the Children used the pilot programmes – the first was launched in 2016 and another this year – as a platform to develop […]

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EMBRACE THE BEAUTY AND THE BEAST OF DIVERSITY – JACKEE HOLDER: COACHING AT WORK CONFERENCE 2017

In her keynote, Jackee Holder, leadership coach, coach trainer, coach supervisor and creative writing facilitator offered a personal lens on diversity and challenged delegates to question their own assumptions around clients’ and their own stories. By Ros Soulsby   Delegates were invited to name diversity rather than pretend it’s not there, and to challenge how we generalise about each other as coaches and clients. Holder shared her experience as first-generation UK Caribbean, living in London’s Brixton area. She highlighted how perspectives differ with the example that the Brixton ‘riots’ of the 1980s were to her, and her community, a political […]

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MY SOUL PURPOSE – A PROFILE OF JACKEE HOLDER

Jackee Holder is an executive coach, supervisor, trainer, author, interfaith minister and committed tree hugger. She is also one of the few black women coaching executives in the UK. Liz Hall finds out more By Liz Hall   Jackee Holder cuts a striking figure on the coaching scene – she’s tall, fascinating and yes, she’s black. One of the first black coaches in the UK, Holder remains a minority in mainstream coaching. However, she’s striking, too, because of her presence. There’s a spaciousness, thoughtfulness, curiosity and open-ness, a sense of vitality in the face of my questioning that as interviewer […]

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Notes to Self

Jackee Holder has kept a journal of her day-to-day life for the past 25 years. It’s her safe space, her place to vent. It also enhances her ability to really show up as an executive coach. Clients and supervisors can feel the benefits, too.

Over 25 years, I have filled close to 100 notebooks with thoughts, reflections, experiences, inspirations, ideas and aspirations. My journal has been a safe and confidential space, devoid of judgment, in which to vent, to rage, siphon off fears and daily dramas and all the things that get in the way of us showing up.

Journal writing is like playing the violin, as writer Kim Stafford describes in her book, The Pen and the Bell: “a violin played every day will keep the vibrations of the music in its body, even while lying still and silent. If it is not played every day, the vibrations dissipate and the wood grows lifeless.”

In my work as an executive coach and coach trainer, journal writing is an integral part of my continuing personal and professional development.
It’s a practice that I believe can benefit coaches, coach supervisors and clients.

Journal writing activates reflection – the ability to step back and pose an enquiry or questions about why things are done in a particular way, and then come to a better understanding of self in the process.

Research from the University of Minnesota showed that workers who write down the day’s events in the office experience a lowering of stress levels and blood pressure. They also experience improvements around physical symptoms and mental health, and the ability to switch off from work, for example (Metro, 2013).

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