Posts

REFLECTIONS ON INTEGRITY – THE APPEAR MODEL

Jonathan Passmore and Eve Turner offer a practical, ethical decision-making framework, APPEAR, as a tool for use by coaches and their supervisors to help guide practitioners through ethical dilemmas in their work and to develop ethical awareness So how much is it worth to your business to win this coaching contract with our organisation?” This […]

Please login to continue reading this article

THE TRUSTING KIND

Coaching supervision has a vital role to play in helping coaches navigate tricky ethical decision-making, yet global practice varies widely. Eve Turner and Jonathan Passmore examine the results of a global research project into supervisors’ practices when presented with difficult dilemmas A few years ago, one of the authors, Eve Turner, was asked for advice […]

Please login to continue reading this article

SPECIAL REPORT: COACHING IN A CRISIS – PART 2: THAT SINKING FEELING

Part 2 in our series of articles marking UK Mental Health Awareness Week (8-14 May): Supporting an organisation and its employees through crisis requires speedy ethical considered responses from HR, including coaching ‘in action’ says The Sun’s former HR director Carrie Birmingham   We live in a world of uncertainty and issues can quickly escalate […]

Please login to continue reading this article

EMCC: SUPPORTING GROWTH

A study from the European Mentoring & Coaching Council on internal coaching highlights what support multinationals need, what the EMCC is already offering, and what it plans to offer, and invites responses from other professional bodies too. Lise Lewis reports It is now the norm for organisations to have an internal coaching capability, and 75% […]

Please login to continue reading this article

RESEARCH MATTERS – MAKING ETHICAL DECISIONS: AN EVALUATION AND A PROPOSITION

Dr Ioanna Iordanou of Oxford Brookes University Business School and author of Values and Ethics in Coaching, discusses the challenges of Codes of Ethics and proposes a systemic approach to an ethical coaching practice Over the past two decades, coaching has seen global exponential growth. Yet, unlike other relevant ‘helping’ professions, such as medicine, nursing, […]

Please login to continue reading this article

Coaching bodies to agree fitness to practise levels

Coaching buyers remain confused by the language around coaching – including ‘accredited’ and ‘master coach’ – and are in danger of using incompetent coaches. One employer told Coaching at Work it had been approached by a ‘master coach’ who, it transpired, had been awarded the title after a five-day intensive programme. Despite the ‘coach’ struggling […]

Please login to continue reading this article

SPECIAL REPORT: DISABILITY

In this three-part report, we look at how coaching can be used to support disabled people. Two coaches and their clients – one a deaf UK-based coach and the other a Greece-based coach with no disabilities – share their experiences and reflections. And David Clutterbuck offers guidance on using mentoring with disabled people PART ONE : […]

Please login to continue reading this article

Welcome to the February 2012 issue of the newsletter

Welcome to the February 2012 issue of the newsletter Coaching at Work has launched a campaign to help increase the amount of high quality health and wellbeing coaching. As part of our Coaching for Health campaign, we’re running lots of editorial including our trends report in the March issue, and on health coaching approaches in […]

Please login to continue reading this article

Let’s challenge leaders on ethics

Coaches should challenge leaders on ethical issues – this is the response of many of you to research showing Britain’s bosses are perceived to prioritise profits over principles. Less than two-fifths of CEOs place ethics at the heart of business decisions, according to the Institute of Leadership and Management (ILM) and Management Today’s Index of […]

Please login to continue reading this article

Coaches should challenge unethical clients

What should coaches do when they think clients are doing something unethical? Should they challenge them? This is a real hot potato at the moment, especially given the fallout from the banking sector, the environmental pressures and the continuing lack of confidence in the current business model. And according to the Index of Leadership Trust, released earlier this month (October), leaders are widely perceived to be prioritising profits over principles.
Some think we should stop playing god and remember our place- which is to serve the client sitting in front of us, and the organisation sponsoring the coaching where this is the case. Others think coaches have a responsibility to speak up, with some- including Institute of Leadership & Management (ILM) chairman Peter Cheese going as far as to wonder whether the current crisis might have been averted if more executive coaches had voiced concerns earlier on. Speaking to Coaching at Work, for our news story on coaches’ responses to the ILM’s Index of Leadership Trust it has just published with Management Today, Cheese said that “The coach acts as a mirror to the individual so they have better understanding of the context they are operating in and of what is good practice. Historically if they had been doing that really well, maybe we wouldn’t have had the problems we had.”
Cheese questions the basis of any coach-client relationship where the coach keeps quiet when they see issues in decisions, where they are compromising ethics. According to the report, less than two-fifths of CEOs place ethics at the heart of business decisions, hence the spotlight being once again on what coaches think they should do when faced with potentially dodgy client behaviour.
In the same issue of Coaching at Work (November/December, Vol 6, Issue 6), Neela Bettridge, executive coach and founder of sustainability consultancy Article 13 writes that “An integration of who we are, with what we do, what we say and how we say it has never been more important, as we approach the perfect storm of a changing business model, rising economic powers and environmental pressure.”
I think she is absolutely right. That goes for our clients too, especially leaders under the spotlight. Personally, I feel we should reflect back what we think we see, including where we think clients may be acting unethically, albeit unconsciously. This is not about getting too big for our boots, or having our own agenda. This is about acting as a mirror, considering the wider picture, not colluding with our client, and not being scared of our client. Most clients will thank us for it.
• What do you think? Should coaches challenge clients on ethical issues? Take part in our online poll here: http://www.coaching-at-work.com/discussions-and-polls/
Not a subscriber? Click here to subscribe and enjoy all the benefits of full membership.

Please login to continue reading this article

Pages

Coaches should challenge unethical clients

19 October 2011 Coaches should challenge unethical clients What should coaches do when they think clients are doing something unethical? Should they challenge them? This is a real hot potato at the moment, especially given the fallout from the banking sector, the environmental pressures and the continuing lack of confidence in the current business model. […]

Please login to continue reading this article

Discussions and Polls

Should coaches and clients sniff bonding hormone oxytocin before sessions? Submit your vote and view the results of the poll so far. If you have a comment, please post below in the Discussion Forum section. Discussion Forum

Please login to continue reading this article