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News:Executive coaching spreads its net wide

US-based Sherpa’s latest annual survey reveals the value and credibility of coaching is at an all-time high, spreading across the globe and creating corporate cultures

This is the year that high-definition video made its mark on coaching, while the number of practitioners using face-to-face coaching fell for the first time in eight years, according to a global survey.
Webcam, a technology that was hardly mentioned even five years ago, is now an important component of service delivery, with 15 per cent of practitioners using it to coach, according to Sherpa’s eighth annual survey – Executive Coaching at the Summit (www.sherpacoaching.com).
The use of video-conferencing is also rising dramatically. External coaches use it more often than internals, by a 22 per cent to 20 per cent margin. And as live, high-quality video starts to become widely available, it will overtake other delivery methods, predicts the report.
Some 92 per cent of internal coaches see face-to-face coaching as the most effective method of delivery, compared to 76 per cent of externals.
The report has thrown up other differences between how external and internal coaches operate, too. Internal coaches meet their clients more often and have more face-to-face meetings – more than half of internals’ coaching is in person, compared to just 40 per cent of externals’ services, the survey notes.
Internal coaches are twice as likely to have weekly meetings, and strongly favour shorter engagements (90 days or less.) Some 27 per cent of externals believe a coaching engagement should last six months or longer, while only 7 per cent of internal coaches opt for engagements that long.

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News: Target-hitting won’t make you feel good at work

It will come as little surprise to many coaches that getting on well with work colleagues and having a good work/life balance are key to feeling good at work. As many coaches used to working on issues concerning emotional intelligence and work/life balance with clients will already suspect, positive relationships and a good work/life balance make all the difference. They are the top two factors in feeling good at work, according to 42 per cent and 40 per cent of workers surveyed, respectively. Some 26 per cent highlight “receiving praise” and 16 per cent, earning the trust of their boss, […]

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News: Professor Passmore wins the 2012 SGCP Research Award

Jonathan Passmore has won an accolade for his ground-breaking research into the psychology of coaching within driver learning. Professor Passmore won the 2012 British Psychological Society’s Special Group in Coaching Psychology (SGCP) Research Award for a distinguished research project. The award was given for his research into the psychology of coaching as a learning methodology and safety intervention in learner driving and its subsequent impact on driver training practice in the UK. The research focused on real-world challenges, incorporating beliefs as well as behavioural change through the coaching interventions researched. The collaboration with the driving industry was noted. Two Student […]

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Opinion: Ethical frameworks

Ethical frameworks – if only life were that simple by Bob Garvey Many coaching bodies create sets of rules around confidentiality. But if ethics are socially defined, and contextually relevant, how can they be right or wrong? Many professional bodies claim their ethical frameworks reassure potential clients or sponsors, and ensure quality control, standards, accountability and protection. These are bold claims. Given the complex arguments surrounding ethical behaviour, is it possible to deliver on these promises? Are ethical frameworks ethical? Ethics is a moral philosophy in which complex issues of good and evil, right and wrong, justice and injustice, are […]

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Viewpoint; Help or harm?

by Sarah Dale

Does coaching work? Should we use hard evidence or our own judgment to tell us if it’s good? Or is client feedback enough?

As an occupational psychologist who coaches, I was pleased to attend discussions about the evidence for coaching effectiveness at the Division of Occupational Psychology conference, specifically in sessions led by Professor Rob Briner. Evidence-based practice was also the theme of the Special Group in Coaching Psychology’s annual conference in December 2012.

The arguments echo a wider debate, often associated with Ben Goldacre, author of Bad Science, which challenges how we decide what works. They raise important questions about what constitutes good evidence. Ignoring these could put us in the same well-meaning boat as 17th century doctors wedded to their useless (or positively harmful) blood-letting practices. However, few of us work with cast-iron evidence for everything we do. Doctors, lawyers, teachers, parents – and psychologists – all rely on their own judgment at times. As a practitioner, the debate leaves me questioning what I should be doing. I get positive feedback from my coaching.

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The Skeptic: Innovation or scam?

The skeptic is a new column by David Clutterbuck, which looks at the “legitimacy” of non-mainstream coaching approaches. This issue we take the example of Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT), and ask, must evidence-based coaching approaches always be our measure of efficacy? I recently initiated a furious debate on the web about a coaching technique called EFT, by asking whether there was any evidence to support its remarkable claims. The furore – from both detractors and supporters, with ‘let’s keep an open mind’ in the middle – made me reflect on what is and isn’t ‘legitimate’ in the world of coaching […]

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Three minutes to midnight: making the world a better place

Want to change the world? We’re listening… This is the fourth in a new series of columns on our role in tackling the complicated economic, environmental and social challenges we face. It will be a place to question, offer, share, explore, challenge, dissent, celebrate, reflect, learn and enjoy Why don’t they just ‘get it’?!” Have you ever felt this frustration? Have your clients? Cassandra, a figure in Greek mythology, was blessed with the power of prophecy, but cursed not to be believed. It’s a heavy burden. Matthew Taylor, CEO of the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts (RSA), spoke […]

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TroubleShooter: The path less stressed

A corporate high flier finds herself at a careers crossroads. How can this executive choose a path that maintains a positive career, while balancing work commitments with personal ones? Andrea has been employed by a leading global bank for nearly 20 years. She is considered a high flier and is a member of the company’s leadership team. The bank values its employees and has a record of longevity with its people. Andrea never planned her career; she simply accepted the promotions and opportunities. She is considered the ‘go-to girl’ for executives wanting to ‘get things done’. Andrea is now being […]

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Profile: Professor Paul Brown

The limbic leader

Neuroscience expert Professor Paul Brown speaks his mind, and it’s our minds he’s passionate about. He tells Liz Hall why the neurobiology of behaviour is the future of coaching

With Paul Brown’s penchant for challenging the status quo, it seems fitting that we meet in London’s Reform Club, birthplace of many of the ideas, ideals and political activity expressed in the UK’s Great Reform Act of 1832.

Members of the former gentlemen’s club have included Winston Churchill, E M Forster, Henry James and H G Wells. Admission is not based on background, but character, talent and achievement – and Professor Brown has all three in abundance.

If anyone can convince me it’s coaching, rather than any other profession, that should carry the baton of neuroscience in the occupational arena, it’s Brown. Not only is he eloquent, charming and irreverent, he has an enormous wealth of expertise and knowledge at his fingertips.

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Rising Tsars

Coaching in Russia is at a much younger stage of development than in the UK. It lacks focus and regulation, and is poorly understood. Yet, coaching is beginning to find its place in the Russian business psyche, reports Lena Smirnova Business coaching classes may not require students to swallow pills, don ear muffs and wriggle into straightjackets, but for some Russian business people it’s a novel practice akin to a psychological experiment. And it’s one they’re often reluctant to take part in. In the 15 years or so that business coaching has been available in Russia, established psychotherapists and psychologists […]

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Give shame a voice in your conversations

International coach federation global conference, 3-6 October 2012, london Coaching in which shame isn’t talked about, probably isn’t going deep enough, said Brené Brown, a research professor at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work. “Shame is the most primitive feeling [we can have]. Forty years of data shows that people showing no capacity for connection experience, no shame, [are] psychopaths” said Brown in her keynote address. “Shame can’t survive being spoken…For shame to survive it needs secrecy, silence and judgment. [So] we talk about holding a space for shame.” She said that the top four triggers for […]

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Disability special report

In this three-part report, we look at how coaching can be used to support disabled people. Two coaches and their clients – one a deaf UK-based coach and the other a Greece-based coach with no disabilities – share their experiences and reflections. And David Clutterbuck offers guidance on using mentoring with disabled people PART ONE : MISSED ABILITY? Disabled people are just like other people. Why offer them particular support as a group? The short answer is because it could help unearth talents that employers are unaware of, says deaf coach, Jane Cordell When I started coaching in 2008, it was […]

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Consuming Passion

Unilever’s Global Mentoring Programme aims to guide its high-potential women into senior roles at the consumer goods giant. Now the course has evolved beyond mentoring, and into sponsorship, too. Katherine Ray reports The Unilever Global Mentoring Programme was launched in March 2009. It had one main objective: to aid the development and accelerate the readiness of high-potential women to enter into senior leadership positions at the consumer multinational. The programme has since evolved beyond mentoring – now it effectively provides sponsorship as well. While participation never guaranteed promotion, mentees could get the guidance they needed to navigate their next career move, […]

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Embracing and Enabling Change – Speakers

Home Programme Keynote sessions Case studies Workshops Conference Material Sponsors Booking Speakers Aboodi Shabi Aboodi Shabi is one of the UK’s most senior coaches, and a pioneer and leader in the UK and European Coaching community. He was a founding co-President of the UK ICF, and has served the profession at all levels internationally. He has worked in the field of personal development for over twenty years, and in coaching since 1996. In that time, he has worked with thousands of coaches across the world. Aboodi has led training for coaches across Europe, and in Asia, North America and South […]

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Embracing and Enabling Change – Workshops

Home Programme Keynote sessions Case studies Workshops Conference Material Sponsors Booking Workshop 1a Mindfulness & coaching to enhance resilience, creativity & wellbeing In this session, Liz Hall will share some preliminary findings from her Mindfulness in Coaching survey and some of the extensive research and thinking on how mindfulness can help us embrace and enable change, and enhance resilience, creativity and wellbeing. She will lead some mindfulness practices, which we can use for ourselves as coaches, and with clients to help them flourish in these challenging times. And there will be an exploration with the group of how we can […]

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Embracing and Enabling Change – Venue

Home Programme Keynote sessions Case studies Workshops Venue Sponsors Booking We are pleased to announce that this year’s venue will be : Holiday Inn, Bloomsbury Coram Street, London, WC1N 1HT http://www.holidayinn.com/hotels/gb/en/london/lonbl/hoteldetail/directions

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Embracing and Enabling Change – Sponsors

Home Programme Keynote sessions Case studies Workshops Conference Material Sponsors Booking Sponsors [toggles title=” GOLD SPONSOR” active=”1″] [toggle title=””] Insala is a leading talent development technology and consulting provider for mentoring and coaching headquartered in the UK. We are the only organisation to provide a single technology solution supporting mentoring and coaching initiatives singularly or in combination. Our solution enables you to match mentees with mentors, coachees with coaches and supports self-matching. We provide the tools for you to track the relationships within your programmes and their outcomes. The solution includes content to guide participants, automated messaging and survey feedback […]

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Embracing and Enabling Change – Programme

Home Programme Keynote sessions Case studies Workshops Conference Material Sponsors Booking Programme Coaching and Mentoring at Work conference Embracing and Enabling Change: Wednesday 11th July 2012 Please note that this programme may be subject to alterations Time Description Speaker 9.00 Registration 9.30 Introductions & welcome Liz Hall 9.45 Keynote 1: Does coaching still matter? Aboodi Shabi 10.25 Case Study 1: Strengths-based coaching for culture change & leadership effectiveness at Samaritans (plus practice in using tools to strengthen performance, resilience and engagement during high uncertainty and change CS1: James Brook & Claire Watt (Chair: David Clutterbuck) Workshop 1a: Mindfulness & Coaching: […]

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Embracing and Enabling Change – Keynote Sessions

Home Programme Keynote sessions Case studies Workshops Conference Material Sponsors Booking KEYNOTE 1: Aboodi Shabi: Does coaching still matter? In the current climate, coaching might look like a luxury or “discretionary” spend, and positive thinking (and the idea that we can have it all) can seem simplistic and irrelevant. How, then, can coaching still matter? In this session, we will explore the idea that, now more than ever, coaching is about more, far more, than helping people achieve their goals. In times of great change and uncertainty, we need to go beyond what we know, which requires resilience, creativity, and […]

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Embracing and Enabling Change – Case Studies

Home Programme Keynote sessions Case studies Workshops Conference Material Sponsors Booking Case Study 1 Strengths-based coaching for culture change & leadership effectiveness at Samaritans (plus practice in using tools to strengthen performance, resilience and engagement during high uncertainty and change): James Brook & Claire Watt Business coaching is still largely based on theories and approaches that have their roots in traditional weakness or pathology-based models of human functioning. Deeply held weakness-based beliefs, attitudes and practices on both sides, many of which are subconscious and programmed through years of learning and socialisation, also jaundice the learning experience from the outset if […]

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